At a glance 1 min

Gas pipes: change comes now!

Gas pipes: change comes now!
Gas pipes: change comes now!

For decades, steel was the only material used for transporting high-pressure gas. And no-one thought of questioning it. That is, until Evonik, a German chemical company, thought that another material could serve the same purpose, and maybe even more efficiently. That was in 2002, the year in which the company began working on developing a high-performance thermoplastic that could replace the steel used in large-diameter, high-pressure gas transportation pipes.

Ten years later, pipes made from high-molecular-weight polyamide 12 (Vestamid ® NRG 2101), were first put on the market. 
In addition to their intrinsic properties:  a very high resistance to mechanical stress, to high pressures and to chemicals, the pipes made from polyamide 12 are lighter than steel pipes, and are therefore easier to transport and assemble: they are less costly to install, easier to maintain and therefore help  save precious money and time. The most difficult part of this adventure: convincing manufacturers and distributors that it was time to take a step into a new era!

The pipes made from Vestamid NRG developed by Evonik Industries won the Innovation Prize of the 2015 European Plastics Innovation Awards.

More information
http://corporate.evonik.de/EN/Pages
 

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